Eerie photos of the former Soviet Union show an abandoned fairground reclaimed by nature, an empty swimming pool and crumbling buildings including a palace in the former USSR.  

The haunting images, from , , Latvia and , show relics of the former Communist regime abandoned in the years since the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991.

The photos show a deserted Baroque palace in Ukraine, a strange configuration of tubes installed at a secret research centre outside Moscow and an iron fountain that was the only part of an Armenian university left standing after a 6.8-magnitude earthquake. 

Among the images are portraits of former Soviet Union Premiers Stalin and Lenin, statues of unknown soldiers and odes to Communism with depictions of Missak Manouchian a French-Armenian poet and communist activist as well as Friedrich Engels and Karl Mark who together wrote the Communist manifesto.

The photos have been released as part of the publication of a new book from Jonglez Photo Books about the Soviet Union by Terence Abela, titled Abandoned USSR. 

Abandoned bumper cars in the fairground of Ukraine’s ‘dead city’ Pripyat, 3km from Chernobyl. The town was evacuated after the April 26, 1986 nuclear disaster and the fairground, which was being built for the MayDay celebrations a few days later, was never officially opened. Authorities briefly allowed residents into the park on April 27 as a distraction from the nuclear catastrophe which was visible from the town but by the end of the month, as the magnitude of the Chernobyl disaster started to become apparent, authorities evacuated the town, leaving nature to reclaim the fairground

The Azure swimming pool, opened in 1970, was one of the Pripyat's facilities not abandoned immediately after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster forced the evacuation of the town in April 1986.
The leisure centre, which also boasts basketball courts, was kept running for people working inside the nuclear exclusion zone until 1998, when it was closed following a health inspection. Today the peeling walls and derelict interior are a popular tourist destination inside the zone
Slide me

The Azure swimming pool, opened in 1970, was one of the Pripyat’s facilities not abandoned immediately after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster forced the evacuation of the town in April 1986. The leisure centre, which also boasts basketball courts, was kept running for people working inside the nuclear exclusion zone until 1998, when it was closed following a health inspection. Today the peeling walls and derelict interior are a popular tourist destination inside the zone